Facebook

If All Jobs Paid The Same Would You Choose Your Job?

Posted July 9, 2019, by Elesha

Let’s say every job in the world, from an ice cream tester to a brain surgeon, paid exactly $93,000.

This isn’t a random number. According to research, beyond a point, more money doesn’t make you happier - once you hit an income of $93,000 your happiness levels plateau.

So, with salary out of the equation, would you still choose your job?

Let’s take a look at other reasons you might choose your job that have nothing to do with earning more money.

6 Reasons To Choose A Job That Have Nothing To Do With Money

Your natural talents are used and valued

Working with your innate talents and skills and having them recognised at work is a super satisfying experience. People who find these types of roles are the ones most likely to say they’re doing the work they love and were born to do.

You feel far more energised, creative and focused when you’re working with your natural gifts instead of trying to force yourself to develop skills that simply aren’t ‘you’.

The job gets you into the ‘flow’ state

The term ‘flow state’ was coined by psychologist Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi in his best selling book Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience.

Getting into a flow state comes from working on a challenge that tests your skills and capabilities just enough that you need to stretch yourself, but not so much that you become anxious.

Essentially, you’re neither bored or overwhelmed, it’s challenging but not rough. Flow is the sweet spot where you feel totally absorbed by what you’re doing and time flies.

Through his research, Csikszentmihalyi discovered people are most happy, productive and creative when they are in a state of flow. This means working in a role that gives you the opportunity to hit this state during the day maximises your happiness levels!

You find meaning in your role - in big or small ways

“If you make money, you might not make meaning.” – Guy Kawasaki

If you plan on spending a good portion of your waking hours working every day, making sure you can find meaning in work is important.

'Meaning' doesn't have to be a big, world-shaking type of impact. We might not all make dramatic life or death contributions like staff working on an emergency ward but we do all serve someone else in what we do.

When university fundraisers actually met the student whose scholarship was funded by their fundraising efforts, they increased 142% in weekly phone minutes and over 400% in weekly revenue. This is a great example of how directly connecting what we do with the people who benefit from our work we can find more meaning in all kinds of jobs.

It perfectly fits your personality and temperament

The right personality fit in a role can be the difference between career success or overwhelming frustration - which no amount of increase in pay could solve.

For example, you might be an incredible technical writer - your more introverted personality and preference to work alone means you’re happy and productive when you're deeply absorbed in writing how-to tech guides for users. However, if you were in a sales role, actually selling the tech - despite knowing it inside out - you might struggle with the overwhelm in dealing with the high level of customer engagement.

Opportunity for personal and professional development

Seeking work that encourages learning, self-awareness, and achievement leads to the expansion of self-worth and opportunities. These elements work together to increase overall well-being both in and out of the workplace.

Improving yourself, your mindset and your skills can also have a positive influence on your colleagues; as they say - a rising tide lifts all the boats.

You have flexibility and freedom

This is why so many entrepreneurs, remote workers, and freelancers choose to work from home - or anywhere in the world. The freedom to set their own hours and create their own working environment is more valuable than the size of a paycheck.

Bucking the traditional 9 - 5 office has become an increasing trend - one that isn’t showing any signs of slowing down. Digital innovation in changing perceptions around locations and working hours and making working remotely as an employee or becoming your own boss easier than ever.

You feel fulfilled by friendships at work

The relationships we build at work can bring meaning and fulfilment to fronting up in the office every day. Many of us seek out workplace cultures where friendships, connections and a sense of community can be forged. Work friends boost morale and are a source of strength to draw on when challenges come our way or the person we know will help share and celebrate our successes.

The reality is, when deciding to work or study for love or money, everyone’s financial situation is different. Money is often a major consideration because #life but that doesn’t mean you should make it your only criteria - consider this list and aim for more!

Really grinding it out in a job you hate? Here are six ways to give your serotonin levels a boost while you plan your escape!

Elesha

Academy Xi
AIM Business School
All Health Training
Australasian College of Health and Wellness
Australian College of Physical Education
Australian Fitness Academy
Australian HR Institute
Australian Institute of Business
Australian Institute of ICT
Australian Institute of Management Education and Training
Australian Institute of Personal Trainers
Builders Academy Australia
Charles Sturt University
College Australia
College for Adult Learning
Deakin University
Dūcere
Edith Cowan University
Ella Bache College
Foundation Education
General Assembly
Griffith University
Hammond Institute
James Cook University Online
La Trobe University Online (Delivered by Didasko)
MCI Institute
Melbourne City Institute of Education
Monarch Institute
Monash University
National College Australia
New Horizons Australia Institute of Technology
Redmako Learning
RMIT Online
The Hotel School
The National Finance Institute
TrainSmart Australia
UniSA Online
University of Adelaide
Torrens University
University of New England
Southern Cross University